G. Pascal Zachary

Writer, Teacher, Scholar

Lectures, Conferences and Media

Zachary addresses a group of journalists in Lilongwe, Malawi
G. Pascal Zachary is a professor of practice at Arizona State University, where he teaches classes on the future of journalism, American history, innovation systems, writing and reporting. He also lectures on African affairs, and the life and legacy of Vannevar Bush, organizer of the Manhattan Project and a seminal figure in the history of computing and information science.
Zachary is frequently comments on current events in the media, either through his own commentary articles or in interviews with journalists. He's done radio interviews with BBC, Voice of America and Marketplace. Most recently, he has been interviewed on innovation by The New York Times and San Jose Mercury News.

Prior to joining the faculty of Arizona State University, Zachary taught journalism and writing at Stanford University and the University of California Graduate School of Journalism.

On the subject of African affairs, Zachary has lectured at UC Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, the University of Puget Sound, Colorado College and Stanford University.

On science, technology and society, he's lectured at the Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC), Tufts University, the California Institute of Technology, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and other colleges and universities.

On diversity, identity and globalization, he has lectured in Britain, Germany, Iceland and Ghana.

On the future of journalism, Zachary has presented to annual meetings of the Association of Alternative Weeklies and at journalism centers in Kampala, Uganda (2014) and Accra, Ghana (2016)


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Books by Zachary

African affairs
a literate and intensely-reported introduction to contemporary Africa
World Affairs
"Zachary approaches the subject with an enormous amount of research and firsthand reporting."
--The New York Times
Biography/History of Techno-science in 20th century America
"Deeply informed and insightful, Zachary has thoroughly captured the spirit of Bush and his times."
--New York Times Book Review
Computers, technology and society
"Riveting"
--Harvard Business Review
"Gripping"
--Fortune
"Compelling"
--Newsweek